Center for Teaching, Learning and Technology
Illinois State University
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Faculty Fellows Workshops for Summer 2017

Join colleagues from across campus as they facilitate workshops that explore new topics in teaching and student learning.

Registration

Each workshop description, below, includes a link to register through the My IllinoisState portal. If you need assistance with this process, please contact CTLT at 438-2542.

Actions Speak Louder Than Words: Engagement through Active Learning and Formative Assessment Challenging Students with Interrupted Case Studies Incorporating Concepts of Character into Your Class One Post and Two Responses: Breathing Life into the Online Discussion Forum
Promoting Online Civic Reasoning and Media Literacy Saving the World One Presentation at a Time Strategies to Address the Challenges of Female Educators Stress in Academia

Saving the World One Presentation at a Time

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Thursday, June 8 • 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Facilitator:
Carolyn Broadbent, Accounting

Students today arrive in classrooms predominately with an "entertain me now" persona.  Does the delivery method we as academics employ "connect" with them?  Develop tools and techniques that can transform your presentation slides into something that truly engages students in the learning process. Workshop participants will leave with an action plan to transform their own presentations. The workshop will primarily utilize PowerPoint as the presentation medium.  However, the techniques and best practices described can be used with any presentation platform (such as Prezi or Word). Lunch is provided. A stipend is available for eligible participants. Registration is required.


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Promoting Online Civic Reasoning and Media Literacy

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Monday, June 12 • 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Facilitators:
Steve Hunt, Communication
Nathan Carpenter, Communication
Sharon Van Der Laan, Milner Library

The most recent Presidential election cycle demonstrated vividly a need for all citizens to learn the critical thinking and media literacy skills necessary to navigate new media landscapes. Given the ubiquitous nature of the Internet, social media, and the rise of fake news, it is clear that those in higher education have a responsibility to equip students with strategies and skills that help them assess the reliability and validity of information they encounter online. In this workshop, you’ll survey a range of activities that can be employed in a variety of disciplines to advance students' online civic reasoning, media literacy skills, and capabilities to communicate effectively and ethically in online environments. A stipend is available for eligible participants. Registration is required.


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Strategies to Address the Challenges of Female Educators

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Monday, June 19 • 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Facilitator:
Shelly Clevenger, Criminal Justice Sciences

Explore the issues facing women in academia. Take part in activities to highlight strategies and techniques for improving these situations. Women as educators in higher education often face issues that their male colleagues do not. This can include being stereotyped, challenges establishing authority in the classroom, facing obstacles or opposition from students, and issues in forming connections or relationships with students. This can be especially challenging for women who teach in male-dominated or traditionally masculine fields. This workshop will empower you to assist yourself or women who face challenges in the classroom based on their gender. Lunch is provided. A stipend is available for eligible participants. Registration is required.


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One Post and Two Responses: Breathing Life into the Online Discussion Forum

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Monday, June 26 • 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Facilitator:
Allison Alcorn, Music

Online discussion forums hold such great potential for student learning… and yet, many online courses have discussions that are nothing more than "make one post and reply to two colleagues' posts." Students follow that instruction, and the "discussion" is over. This workshop will help you to compare and contrast both the challenges and the opportunities in online discussion forums. Through an evaluation of relevant research and best practices, you’ll explore how to transform traditional, face-to-face practices into an online experience whether used in a flipped, hybrid, or fully online setting. You’ll also construct three online discussion forums for a single course, utilizing the principles and practices discussed. Lunch is provided. A stipend is available for eligible participants. Registration is required.


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Challenging Students with Interrupted Case Studies

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Monday, July 10 • 9 a.m. to Noon

Facilitator:
Bill Anderson, Family and Consumer Sciences

Case studies can serve as a context for meaning-making during instruction. However, case-based instruction (CBI) also has recognized limitations. For instance, many case studies are limited in length, address only a few course concepts,  and can be, potentially, a largely passive activity. This workshop will introduce an interrupted case-studies (ICS) format that could address almost all limitations typically associated with CBI, as well as raise critical thinking levels by providing vicarious, but meaningful, opportunities to relate course material to case-study events and individuals. Participants will compare and contrast CBI and ICS, participate in a small-scale ICS, and develop ways to move currently used print and video case studies to an interrupted format. A stipend is available for eligible participants. Registration is required.


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Incorporating Concepts of Character into Your Class

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Monday, July 10 • 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Facilitators:
Phyllis McCluskey-Titus, Educational Administration and Foundations
Jim Almeda, Health Promotion and Wellness
Nikki Brauer, Health Promotion and Wellness
Kerri Calvert, Health Promotion and Wellness

"Character Day," celebrated this year on September 13, gives campus communities the opportunity to talk about common values and character strengths that each member possesses and contributes. Within your class, there may be opportunities to incorporate activities and conversation around character. This program, presented by Illinois State faculty and staff, and coordinated by Heath Promotion and Wellness, can assist you in creating class sessions that allow students to understand the concept of character, assess their character strengths, and share in conversations about what character means. You’ll learn how to help students identify meaningful connections between themselves and their classmates and to reflect on how their values and strengths align with their actions and behaviors. Bring your course syllabus or outline and be prepared to brainstorm and discuss plans for your class with facilitators and colleagues. A stipend is available for eligible participants. Registration is required.


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Actions Speak Louder Than Words: Engagement through Active Learning and Formative Assessment

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Monday, July 17 • 9 a.m. to noon

Facilitator:
Terry Husband, School of Teaching and Learning

Research shows that millennial college students prefer to learn in classroom environments that are hands-on, discussion based, technology enriched, and active in nature. It’s a dramatically different approach than what we, as students, probably experienced. In this workshop, you’ll examine the benefits of using active learning strategies as opposed to traditional teaching methods. You’ll identify a wide range of active learning strategies and examples of how these strategies might be incorporated into your classes. You’ll also explore a wide range of traditional and digital formative assessment tools that might be used in the classroom. A stipend is available for eligible participants. Registration is required.


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Stress in Academia

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Monday, July 24 • 1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Facilitator:
Deneca Avant, Social Work

Stress in academia is a daunting reality. The ability to identify and manage stress can make the difference between professional success and personal neglect. Too often educators fail to acknowledge increased stress levels and properly balance self-care while concentrating on the institution of higher education. Occupational and personal stress poses a threat to physical health, which consequently contributes to the elevated levels of burnout and compassion fatigue that is frequently recognized in academia. This workshop presents an overview of managing stress and demonstrates how to apply various self-care approaches in everyday practice. Explore proven techniques and strategies that can set you on the route to a much calmer, happier, and fulfilled life . A stipend is available for eligible participants. Registration is required.


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If you need a special accommodation to fully participate in a CTLT event, please contact the front desk at (309) 438-2542.

2017-05-17T11:20:34.345-05:00 2017